Timezone: »

 
Poster
State-Reification Networks: Improving Generalization by Modeling the Distribution of Hidden Representations
Alex Lamb · Jonathan Binas · Anirudh Goyal · Sandeep Subramanian · Ioannis Mitliagkas · Yoshua Bengio · Michael Mozer

Thu Jun 13 06:30 PM -- 09:00 PM (PDT) @ Pacific Ballroom #1

Machine learning promises methods that generalize well from finite labeled data. However, the brittleness of existing neural net approaches is revealed by notable failures, such as the existence of adversarial examples that are misclassified despite being nearly identical to a training example, or the inability of recurrent sequence-processing nets to stay on track without teacher forcing. We introduce a method, which we refer to as state reification, that involves modeling the distribution of hidden states over the training data and then projecting hidden states observed during testing toward this distribution. Our intuition is that if the network can remain in a familiar manifold of hidden space, subsequent layers of the net should be well trained to respond appropriately. We show that this state-reification method helps neural nets to generalize better, especially when labeled data are sparse, and also helps overcome the challenge of achieving robust generalization with adversarial training.

Author Information

Alex Lamb (Universite de Montreal)
Jonathan Binas (Mila, Montreal)
Anirudh Goyal (Université de Montréal)
Sandeep Subramanian (MILA)
Ioannis Mitliagkas (MILA, UdeM)
Yoshua Bengio (Mila / U. Montreal)

Yoshua Bengio is recognized as one of the world’s leading experts in artificial intelligence and a pioneer in deep learning. Since 1993, he has been a professor in the Department of Computer Science and Operational Research at the Université de Montréal. He is the founder and scientific director of Mila, the Quebec Institute of Artificial Intelligence, the world’s largest university-based research group in deep learning. He is a member of the NeurIPS board and co-founder and general chair for the ICLR conference, as well as program director of the CIFAR program on Learning in Machines and Brains and is Fellow of the same institution. In 2018, Yoshua Bengio ranked as the computer scientist with the most new citations, worldwide, thanks to his many publications. In 2019, he received the ACM A.M. Turing Award, “the Nobel Prize of Computing”, jointly with Geoffrey Hinton and Yann LeCun for conceptual and engineering breakthroughs that have made deep neural networks a critical component of computing. In 2020 he was nominated Fellow of the Royal Society of London.

Mike Mozer (Google Research & U. Colorado Boulder)

Related Events (a corresponding poster, oral, or spotlight)

More from the Same Authors